Compassionate Witness

One of my favorite items is a small tooled leather notebook cover by Oberon Design*. It holds a tiny Moleskine book that has become a core part of my creative practice, moving it from the mundane to the spiritual, and augmenting the resilience I draw from it. I call it my “Witness Book”.

Within the body of practice known as Intentional Creativity, we commonly refer to the legend of the Red Thread, which says that we are connected from birth by an invisible red thread to all those whom we need to meet in our life on Earth. This thread can stretch and tangle, but it can never break. When we claim “our piece of the red thread”, we claim that work to we are connected at a soul level in this world.

So often, though, we feel responsible for the whole ball of yarn. Whether it’s unpredictable tragedy that strikes someone close to us, or unfathomable human cruelty an ocean away reported on the 5 o’clock news, our hearts tell us there must be something we can do. But often there isn’t, and it becomes unbearable.

When that happens, I use my Witness Book to write a simple note about the situation. Often, I will take pages or scraps of sketches from this book and collage them into my art journals or paintings, infusing them with sacred intention. This practice of witnessing, a sort of written prayer, helps me to reflect and know whether to act…or to release, knowing that this piece of the red thread will indeed be taken up by those who own it. 

I value this practice because it gives me the strength to witness pain and darkness without turning away, even when I don’t know what to do. And in the brightest moments, a new truth or opportunity is illuminated.

Then, I pick up that new piece of red thread and weave it into my days going forward.

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*Disclaimer: I am not an affiliate of Oberon. I just love this item!

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